Track level

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Mike_R
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Joined: Fri Jul 03, 2009 7:05 pm

Track level

Post by Mike_R » Sun Nov 11, 2012 11:05 pm

After a bit of a problem with the super-elevation on my module at the Broadclyst meeting yesterday, I was trying to figure out how to measure it.
I then remembered I had an app on my iPod to measure gradients. https://itunes.apple.com/gb/artist/kevi ... d305581830
Placing the iPod on the track was OK but no good for moving along the track. I have some accurate square steel blocks (I made them during my apprenticeship, never saw the point, but they are great for structure building!) one of those helped. Then I put it on a flat car, but I found a car rocks too much.
Finally I decided to make a measuring car. I made a plastic mount for the iPod mounted on a truck, This still rocked a bit so added some pads to the underside so it ran on the axles instead of the axle boxes.

Image

A bolt through the plastic layers and truck hold it all together

Image

The app measures gradient % and degrees, degrees are how super elevation or cant is usually measured.

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The top layer can turn so it can also measure the gradient.

I can now push the car slowly along the track and see how much cant I have.
Mike Ruby

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torikoos
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Location: Newton Abbot, Devon, UK .
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Re: Track level

Post by torikoos » Sun Nov 11, 2012 11:14 pm

excellent idea Mike, I have the same App, and this is a real practical way of measuring super elevation etc , thanks for sharing!

Koos
Koos Fockens -Devon UK. North American Model Railroading
Age is just a case of mind over matter. If you don't mind, then it doesn't matter.

Mike_R
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Joined: Fri Jul 03, 2009 7:05 pm

Re: Track level

Post by Mike_R » Sun Nov 11, 2012 11:20 pm

Thanks

I have just about got the cant to where it should be, tomorrow I'll re-ballast and we will see if anything derails this Saturday!
Mike Ruby

Mike_R
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Joined: Fri Jul 03, 2009 7:05 pm

Re: Track level

Post by Mike_R » Mon Nov 12, 2012 2:12 pm

I should add that the bit of bent metal in two photos is my favourite track reworking tool. It is bent from a bit of nickelsilver plate. The plain end is used to lever track up from alongside a spike or pin, preventing the rail being ripped off the ties, and was very useful for this levelling job after cutting through the ballast. This end was also used to clear out beneath the track and hold the track up while placing cardboard strips under the track.
The other end is tapered and thinned, with a narrow slot, spike shaft width cut in it. This end can get under a spike or pin head and lever it out without damaging track or spike.
Before this I used screw drivers, pliers etc. sound familiar? which often damaged ties.

Like the level car it was built after struggling to do a job, and for a little bit of work gives a tool that makes life easier from now on.
Mike Ruby

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torikoos
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Re: Track level

Post by torikoos » Mon Nov 12, 2012 6:38 pm

another good idea Mike :-)

koos
Koos Fockens -Devon UK. North American Model Railroading
Age is just a case of mind over matter. If you don't mind, then it doesn't matter.

800266
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Re: Track level

Post by 800266 » Mon Feb 11, 2013 8:33 pm

I use the Micro Mark digital level meter (designed I think for machine tool beds) but put it on a long wheelbased flat car with vertically restricted axles.
I find you need to measure gradient (I have some at 2.8% and superelevation over a longish length otherwise in the short lengths the readout varies
too frequently so is hard to appreciate in % terms Ron Gager

Mike_R
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Joined: Fri Jul 03, 2009 7:05 pm

Re: Track level

Post by Mike_R » Mon Feb 11, 2013 9:20 pm

I find the single truck does help find small dips in the track. The truck has been altered so it runs on it's axles to stop it wobbling.

I have bought a Micromark weight gauge that I plan to fit into a car for testing haulage power.
Mike Ruby

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